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Awareness Week

The Third Letter

When we launched our new logo last year, we did so to highlight the fact that the D in OCD the D means 'disorder'. For OCD Awareness Week Patrick, the host of the blog morethanmydiagnoses created this great piece about that 'third letter'.

Morethanmydiagnoses is an honest and frank record of mental illness and recovery.

Article posted on: Wed, 11/10/2017 - 4:41pm Read more...

Becca shares her video blog for OCD Awareness Week

Becca

A little while ago @BeccaACairns recorded this video blog about her OCD experiences with sexual obsessional fears. She has experienced various types of OCD since early childhood but that this aspect of OCD has felt the most destructive to her in terms of her identity and more defining life choices like starting a family.

Becca wanted to share this video for OCD Awareness Week, saying “I just wish people spoke about it more but I understand that it's taken me 29 years! We need to talk about it - to dissolve it of its power and end the stigma.”

Click the read more link to view the video blog.

Article posted on: Wed, 11/10/2017 - 3:25pm Read more...

OCD Awareness Week 2017 - Get Involved!

Giving you a voice - OCD Awareness Week

Next week (8-14th Oct 2017) is OCD Awareness Week, and this gives you a platform for your voice to be heard!  As you may have already read on our homepage, here is some of what we are doing each day of OCD Awareness Week.

  • Posting and busting a myth about OCD each day
  • Talking about OCD to different audiences
  • Highlight OCD Awareness Week across our neighbouring businesses and community

This is where you can get involved. If all of our supporters, and everyone with an interest in OCD shared/re-tweeted one, or all of the facts/myths we will publish daily, then our reach to change perceptions and opinions about OCD could be globally significant. If you're feeling comfortable enough, then telling your social media followers about your own experiences of OCD could have an even bigger impact. Talking about our OCD is not easy, but only by sharing our experiences, even when it is uncomfortable and embarrassing to do so, can we start to changes people's opinions and perception about OCD.

Another way you can get involved is ask permission to display a poster in your school, university, office or any other public building during OCD Awareness Week. Below we share details of how you can access these materials:

Remember, we all have the ability to influence change! So what will you do?

7 ideas for 7 days of OCD awareness

Click the read more link for those 7 ideas!

Article posted on: Fri, 06/10/2017 - 2:20pm Read more...

One conversation at a time...

Beth

First published in the OCD-UK members magazine Compulsive Reading in April 2015.

To coin a phrase from the Time to Change website, "There are no hard and fast rules for talking about your mental health" says OCD-UK project coordinator, Beth Hemus.

Article posted on: Thu, 05/10/2017 - 2:23pm Read more...

OCD Awareness Week 2017

OCD Awareness Week 2017

People still think OCD means being neat, tidy, clean and organised. We need to say to them, 'think again!'. We need to tell them that Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a seriously debilitating disorder which leads the sufferer to having unwanted debilitating intrusive thoughts rendering day-to-day life a living nightmare. That's OCD!

Which is exactly why we are promoting OCD Awareness Week again in October 2017 (8-14th October 2017).

OCD Awareness Week is a global effort to raise awareness and understanding about OCD, with the goal of educating people and working towards removing misunderstanding and stigma that can be caused by misrepresentation of OCD. Launched in 2009 by the International OCD Foundation (a US based charity), OCD Awareness Week is now promoted by a number of organisations across the world, and OCD-UK are delighted to be taking the lead here in the UK.

For 2017 we have already liaised with various media outlets, and hope to see some attention given to OCD Awareness Week in the media. We will be publishing a series of content each day during OCD Awareness Week again focussing on the myths and misconceptions about OCD. We have also invested in a series of posters and handouts which we can send you if you're able to distribute in your workplace, school or uni, just let us know how many you want and your postal address.

Visit our OCD Awareness Week resources page by clicking here for more ideas of how you can get involved.

Article posted on: Thu, 05/01/2017 - 3:13pm Read more...

Thank You for OCD Awareness Week

As OCD Awareness Week concludes we want to thank each and every one of you that got involved in some capacity. Whilst we may not have received lots of media coverage this week we want you to rest assured all of your efforts HAVE reached people, and HAVE made a difference.

As one of our friends commented this morning, #OCDWeek is as much about informing undiagnosed sufferers as it's about educating the wider public of OCD and that is exactly what OCD Awareness Week achieved.

This week we have had both emails and telephone calls from people who now know they have OCD all because they saw OCD Awareness Week content somewhere, and we also know that people have reached out to those sharing #OCDweek content, and we don’t know, but it’s just possible those people now feel less isolated.

Article posted on: Sat, 15/10/2016 - 4:00pm Read more...

Recovery is possible and necessary

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different account of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

As we conclude OCD Awareness Week, we promote the international flavour of the week, with this fascinating story from Audrey in Canada.

I am writing this article in the hopes that someone will read it and feel hopeful that they will be able to gain the upper hand in their battle with OCD.   

I am a 59 year old College teacher, happily married for 35 years, with 2 young adult kids.  I have battled OCD in one form or another for the past 34 years, with intermittent episodes during my childhood and adolescence. I would like people to know that there isn't a single approach to winning this war (and yes sometimes it has felt like a war). I believe that the answer lies in consistent, near-daily challenges to the behaviours and thoughts that underlie this condition.  In my case, medication has proven an invaluable help.  I have been fortunate to benefit from the expertise of excellent psychologists.  An extremely supportive husband has been at the foundation of my near-recovery. 

As a young child, I was obsessed with the need to be honest.  I remember having to keep track all day of things which I needed to confess to my Mom. The theme of honesty revisited me during my adolescence, though it was an intermittent struggle. The tenacious onset of OCD really occurred in my mid 20s, about one year after our marriage.

Article posted on: Sat, 15/10/2016 - 2:05pm Read more...

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