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It is important that we speak up - Kirstie shares her experiences of OCD

Kirstie and son Blair

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different account of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

Today Kirstie @ittywoof bravely shares her recent experiences of OCD and how it's currently imapcting on her.

So the past few weeks have been pretty unkind to my family. Our pet dog suddenly died after a routine medical procedure, we also went through a month long miscarriage and all whilst dealing with a poorly toddler (and our wedding happening 6 weeks later!). It was clear the OCD was going to rear its ugly head. Stress is a huge trigger for OCD.

The running theme through all this was grief and loss. Now for the OCD this is like a red rag to a bull. Especially, considering at the root of my OCD was the fear of losing loved ones. Having no control over any of these scenarios and trying to function on a day to day basis I admit has been a struggle for us a family. Each scenario on there own is something that is often not spoken about.

"I think it's important that we speak up and share when we are struggling."

Often the feelings of shame, embarrassment, not wanting to admit that you're struggling or out of fear that you'll be viewed as a failure stops us from talking about our experiences. However, I think it's important that we speak up and share when we are struggling. It's equally as important as sharing the good times.

It's OCD Awareness Week from 9th -15th October 2016. OCD is often stigmatised and stereotyped by many and viewed as 'the cleaning condition' or the term is used to label someone who likes to be tidy! It's not often viewed as a serious and debilitating condition.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is so much more than the myths and stereotypes. The chaos and destruction it can cause in people's lives can be frankly devastating. However, the more we raise awareness and share our experiences of OCD it helps to reduce the stereotypes and stigma associated with the condition.

Whilst OCD can be a serious and debilitating mental health condition, its important to remember it is also something that can be recovered from with the right treatments such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy.

Whilst the OCD has given me a tough time this month; through seeking support and sharing my experiences I know I'm going to overcome this.

For more information on OCD, please visit www.ocduk.org

Kirstie.

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