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October 2016

This page provides a month-by-month list of the latest and archived news stories published on our website.

IAPT Annual Report Summary - 2015/2016

NHS England

In our April members magazine, Compulsive Reading we published our summary of the 'Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC)' annual report of IAPT data for the year 2014/15. In our summary we reported that the data showed big differences in recovery rates for people seeking treatment for OCD with local IAPT services across England.

For those that don’t know what IAPT is, the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies initiative was introduced across England to improve access to psychological therapies, such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). Each region has its own local IAPT service commissioned by local Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG) and all with their own local name (i.e. Let’s Talk, Healthy Minds, Talk Liverpool).

The ‘Psychological Therapies Annual Report on the use of IAPT services’ is published annually and presents a picture of activity in IAPT services and of the people that used them. The report published both national data and local CCG data broken down to reports on recovery data per condition, including OCD.

Last week NHS Digital (the new name for the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC)l) published the new and their fourth annual report of IAPT data for the 2015/16 period. We will once again review it and summarise on it in our next OCD-UK members magazine and on this website, however for those interested in stats, here is the top line from the report ( for all conditions treated, not just OCD):

Article posted on: Mon, 24/10/2016 - 10:32pm Read more...

Thank You for OCD Awareness Week

As OCD Awareness Week concludes we want to thank each and every one of you that got involved in some capacity. Whilst we may not have received lots of media coverage this week we want you to rest assured all of your efforts HAVE reached people, and HAVE made a difference.

As one of our friends commented this morning, #OCDWeek is as much about informing undiagnosed sufferers as it's about educating the wider public of OCD and that is exactly what OCD Awareness Week achieved.

This week we have had both emails and telephone calls from people who now know they have OCD all because they saw OCD Awareness Week content somewhere, and we also know that people have reached out to those sharing #OCDweek content, and we don’t know, but it’s just possible those people now feel less isolated.

Article posted on: Sat, 15/10/2016 - 4:00pm Read more...

Recovery is possible and necessary

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different account of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

As we conclude OCD Awareness Week, we promote the international flavour of the week, with this fascinating story from Audrey in Canada.

I am writing this article in the hopes that someone will read it and feel hopeful that they will be able to gain the upper hand in their battle with OCD.   

I am a 59 year old College teacher, happily married for 35 years, with 2 young adult kids.  I have battled OCD in one form or another for the past 34 years, with intermittent episodes during my childhood and adolescence. I would like people to know that there isn't a single approach to winning this war (and yes sometimes it has felt like a war). I believe that the answer lies in consistent, near-daily challenges to the behaviours and thoughts that underlie this condition.  In my case, medication has proven an invaluable help.  I have been fortunate to benefit from the expertise of excellent psychologists.  An extremely supportive husband has been at the foundation of my near-recovery. 

As a young child, I was obsessed with the need to be honest.  I remember having to keep track all day of things which I needed to confess to my Mom. The theme of honesty revisited me during my adolescence, though it was an intermittent struggle. The tenacious onset of OCD really occurred in my mid 20s, about one year after our marriage.

Article posted on: Sat, 15/10/2016 - 2:05pm Read more...

OCD Awareness Week - OCD Fact 7

OCD Awareness Week - Fact 7

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different fact about Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). We encourage our followers to copy the text and/or image and retweet/post across their social media pages.

 

OCD Awareness Week - Fact 7
OCD is no joking matter, the D in OCD means it is a disorder that causes great distress and disruption to a person's life.

Article posted on: Sat, 15/10/2016 - 1:35pm Read more...

What to expect after good quality treatment for OCD

Professor Paul Salkovskis

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different account of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

During OCD Awareness Week we have heard some honest and candid stories from some brave people, some of whom have commented that they know they will always have to live with OCD. So we asked an OCD specialist to talk to us about recovery and if people will always have OCD. Professor Paul Salkovskis shares his view...

What to expect after good quality treatment for OCD: Recovery, Cure, Resolution or just learning to live with it?
By Professor Paul Salkovskis (Professor of Clinical Psychology and Applied Science, Department of Psychology, University of Bath).

For OCD Awareness week 2016, I have tried to briefly tackle this tough issue at the request of OCD-UK. This is just a short piece written quickly, so please forgive me for the various things I have undoubtedly left out, and for the misunderstanding which may arise from my clumsy phrasing. 

Article posted on: Sat, 15/10/2016 - 1:31pm Read more...

Bronwen shares her OCD experience

Giving you a voice - OCD Awareness Week

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different account of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

As we conclude OCD Awareness Week, Bronwen tells us how important it is that through OCD awareness week even more people are made aware of the effects of OCD, understand treatment options, and fight to reduce the stigma surrounding mental health.

As is the case with many other people diagnosed with OCD, I can look back and see signs of OCD from the age of 15 years old, however it would be five years later I managed to get a diagnosis. Also similar to other individuals, I find that my OCD peaks and troughs as a result of life events and stress. My OCD may be considered a type of magical thinking, where most of my obsessions relate to preventing harm to others and the world around me, and my compulsions involve me repeating actions until they have been done on a safe thought or until it “feels right”. As OCD worsens, the more space it takes up- at times I find it difficult to get dressed, go up and down stairs, walk in the street, turn on and off light switches, and type on a computer.

Article posted on: Sat, 15/10/2016 - 10:28am Read more...

Dear OCD Sufferer

Giving you a voice - OCD Awareness Week

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different account of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

Today's fantastically positive story is being published by OCD-UK volunteer Ruth, and is published with permission from her blog.

 

Dear OCD sufferer,

My name is Ruth, I am 47 years old. I was diagnosed with OCD when I was 24.  I believe I had it for a long time before that, but there was very little awareness of OCD back then.

I really wanted to write to you to let you know that there is hope.

This week is OCD awareness week, and I really wanted to write to you to let you know that there is hope, that I have been where you are now, living with severe OCD. I was in the depths of despair, believing life would only ever be a constant stream of terrorising and guilt ridden days. I have lost count of the number of people I believe I had either harmed through my mistakes or through carelessness. When I was at my worst every day I believed I had either seriously harmed or killed people through coming into contact with contamination and not acting responsibly enough. This was despite the hundreds of daily rituals, changing clothes every time I went out and showering several times a day until I could take no more, throwing away clothes and items I felt were too contaminated to ever be clean again, disinfecting shoes, my phone, handbag, my car – the daily rituals were endless, but they were never enough. However hard I tried to avoid contaminates, and however many times I showered and changed into clean clothes, I still believed I had left a risk to others lives, it was exhausting and I can still remember the desperate yearning I had for some rest from the thoughts of being a bad person that was selfishly not doing enough to protect others.

Article posted on: Sat, 15/10/2016 - 9:50am Read more...

OCD Awareness Week - OCD Myth 7

OCD Awareness Week - Myth 7

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different myth and mythbuster about Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). We encourage our followers to copy the text and/or image and retweet/post across their social media pages.

Today's myth is perhaps a little reminder to us all. As we have seen from the brave stories being shared this week, even when OCD takes us to a dark place, it is possible that with the right support we can fight back, people can and do recover.

OCD Awareness Week - Myth 7
Myth: OCD can't be cured.
Mythbuster: With good therapy some people can and do recover from OCD to live happy and healthy lives.

Article posted on: Sat, 15/10/2016 - 9:30am Read more...

OCD Awareness Week - OCD Fact 6

OCD Awareness Week - Fact 6

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different fact about Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). We encourage our followers to copy the text and/or image and retweet/post across their social media pages.

 

OCD Awareness Week - Fact 6
The average age for OCD onset is early twenties in women and late adolescence in men, but can affect children as young as 6 or 7.

Article posted on: Fri, 14/10/2016 - 2:10pm Read more...

OCD Awareness Week - OCD Myth 6

OCD Awareness Week - Myth 6

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different myth and mythbuster about Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). We encourage our followers to copy the text and/or image and retweet/post across their social media pages.

 

OCD Awareness Week - Myth 6
Myth: People with OCD wash their hands a lot.
Mythbuster: Compulsive hand washing is only one type of OCD symptom and that only impacts on about 26.5% of people with OCD. There are many other less visible OCD symptoms that equally cause great distress.

Article posted on: Fri, 14/10/2016 - 1:30pm Read more...

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