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Lynsey and Sam running the 2010 British 10K for OCD-UK
OCD-UK is only able to function through the generosity of our members fundraising efforts, so why not get fit, and fundraise for OCD-UK at the same time by participating in a fundraising run in 2013.
Break Free From OCD - Book Review
The press release for the book describes this as a practical guide written by three leading CBT experts which enables you to make sense of your symptoms, and gives a clear plan to help you conquer OCD. The book does not fail to offer that!
Our online OCD support forums.
Our community support discussion forums are a place where we facilitate a safe environment for people affected by OCD to communicate with each other.
Watch our 'Understanding OCD' Awareness video.
We hope that our video featuring Coronation Street actor Ian Puleston-Davies talking about his own OCD will offer hope and inspiration to the estimated 741,504 children and adults living with OCD here in the UK.
OCD Awareness Week 2016
OCD Awareness Week is now promoted by a number of organizations across the world, and OCD-UK are delighted to be taking the lead here in the UK. October 2016, get involved!
Become a member of OCD-UK to receive your copy of Compulsive Reading
It's with great pleasure we confirm the latest issue of our members magazine, Compulsive Reading, and what's more, in addition to the great content.
Image of upset child
Distressing, upsetting, stressful, debilitating and disabling are all words used to describe how OCD can make someone feel and why the illness is listed amongst the top ten most debilitating illnesses by the World Health Organisation.
Locked is a short OCD film
Locked is a short OCD film, partly based on the OCD experiences of OCD-UK trustee, Claire Gellard and which previously won an award at the 2012 Scottish Mental Health Arts and Film Festival.
Some of our East Midland volunteers
Some of our lovely volunteers pictured taking part in our 'Are you a little bit OCD?' awareness and anti-stigma project in Nottingham.
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Welcome to OCD-UK

OCD-UK is the leading national charity, independently working with and for almost one million children and adults whose lives are affected by Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

Our vision is one of a society where everyone affected by Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder should receive the most appropriate, and the highest quality standards of care, support and treatment.

Read more about OCD-UK

OCD Awareness Week - OCD Myth 5

OCD Awareness Week - Myth 5

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different myth and mythbuster about Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). We encourage our followers to copy the text and/or image and retweet/post across their social media pages.

 

OCD Awareness Week - Myth 5
Myth: OCD has no impact on quality of life.
Mythbuster: Anxiety or distress and interference with a person's normal routine is necessary for a diagnosis of OCD. (Hence, the D for Disorder in OCD).

Article posted on: Thu, 13/10/2016 - 9:35am Read more...

Chloe - OCD, hospital and hope

Chloe

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different account of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

For OCD Awareness Week Chloe Brazener shares her difficult experience of OCD and how far she's come in that time...

OCD is a widely misunderstood and debilitating mental health condition that has a devastating impact both on the lives of sufferers and their families. OCD is often misconstrued with symptoms including being neat and tidy or repeated hand washing, but there is far more to this condition.

First, let's debunk the myth that it is about having all your possessions neatly ordered in a certain way. Many sufferers of OCD in fact experience disturbing and distressing thoughts that they are responsible for situations or events beyond their control. For instance, a sufferer may worry that if they do not repeatedly count to ten and back something bad may happen to a loved one.

My experience of OCD began around the time I was in sixth-form studying for my A Levels. I remember a teacher held a piece of my work up to the class and praised me on how beautifully presented it was. As a shy and quiet individual I felt my heart bursting with pride at the attention my work was being given. However, I was unaware of how damaging this was to my education and mental health. Over time, there were occasions in which I could not hand in pieces of coursework because I was convinced that I must repeatedly rewrite all of my work until it was "perfect", anything less was not enough.

Article posted on: Wed, 12/10/2016 - 7:08pm Read more...

OCD Awareness Week - OCD Fact 4

OCD Awareness Week - Fact 4

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different fact about Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). We encourage our followers to copy the text and/or image and retweet/post across their social media pages.

 

OCD Awareness Week - Fact 4
In addition to the sufferer, loved ones are often inadvertently involved in compulsive rituals, putting pressure and demands on their lives too.

Article posted on: Wed, 12/10/2016 - 2:10pm Read more...

The Affliction of Addiction

Gabe

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different account of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

Today, OCD-UK volunteer Gabe shares his very honest and candid experience of OCD and alcohol abuse, this is his story....

As a child I was often described as a worrier. I suffered from, what I now recognise as obsessions, from a very early age, and I can recall being troubled for extended periods of time about nuclear war and AIDS. The latter particularly following the 'Don't Die of Ignorance'.campaign in 1987. I was eight years old at the time and learned everything I could about the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). During my teenage years I developed an obsession about having a heart attack (cardiophobia) and used to check my pulse regularly, much to the amusement of my friends. That was possibly the only physical compulsion I have ever had.

My first experiences with alcohol was during my early teens. I remember drinking cider in a park and all my anxiety just melted away, leaving me with blissful sensations of serenity, confidence and joy. At the tender age of fifteen I was drinking every weekend, often passing out at gigs and parties and, emboldened by the drink, getting myself into mischief. By the age of nineteen I'd left home to go to university and was drinking pretty much every night of the week. Looking back, I think I was dependent upon alcohol by the age of twenty and used to suffer panic attacks when I tried to sober up. Though I hadn't been formerly diagnosed, I wrote a poem at university about my hangovers. It was entitled Alcoholic Insanity and included the recurring verse 'am I going insane?' It ended 'I must be insane, because the [alcoholic] cycle starts again!'

It wasn't until I was in my mid-twenties that I was diagnosed as having OCD, after I was referred to see a psychologist by an alcohol counsellor who had suggested my drink problem might be attributable to an anxiety disorder. As I'm sure you can appreciate, those were dark days. Each morning I'd wake up not just with the physical symptoms of a hangover, with which most people will be familiar, but feeling extremely anxious. In fact my anxiety became so bad that I started making appointments to see my GP in an effort to get prescriptions for tranquillisers, which is what led to my referral to the counsellor in the first place.

Article posted on: Wed, 12/10/2016 - 11:18am Read more...

OCD Awareness Week - OCD Myth 4

OCD Awareness Week - Myth 4

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different myth and mythbuster about Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). We encourage our followers to copy the text and/or image and retweet/post across their social media pages.

 

OCD Awareness Week - Myth 4
Myth: It's ok to joke about OCD
Mythbuster: There's nothing funny about the distress, anxiety or fear that OCD causes.

Article posted on: Wed, 12/10/2016 - 9:35am Read more...

Be OCD Aware

Rachel

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different account of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

We were delighted to receive this article that Rachel prepared for her work press, and she's subsequently told us that she's already had someone at work contact her with their OCD 'story'. Fantastic Rachel, well done. This is Rachel's article.

As an OCD sufferer, I have struggled for years to deal with how this mental illness affects me, and found it difficult to develop coping mechanisms when I sense that ‘things’ aren’t going very well. In a move which inadvertently exacerbates my condition, I have tended to turn introvert in desperation to blot out the underlying roots of the problem. It is after years of soul-searching and in-depth self-analysis that I realise a significant part of my frustration lies within the lack of understanding of the illness itself, and the inaccurate portrayal of an often-debilitating mental disease in the public eye. My two aims of late are quite simply:

  • To help dispel the myths surrounding this illness
  • To share with and learn from, others, our experiences and coping mechanisms
Article posted on: Tue, 11/10/2016 - 3:35pm Read more...

OCD Awareness Week - OCD Fact 3

OCD Awareness Week - Fact 3

This week is OCD Awareness Week, and each day we will be publishing a different fact about Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). We encourage our followers to copy the text and/or image and retweet/post across their social media pages.

 

OCD Awareness Week - Fact 3
The World Health Organisation included OCD in the top ten most debilitating illnesses in terms of loss of income and quality of life.

Article posted on: Tue, 11/10/2016 - 2:50pm Read more...

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Charity Registration Number: 1103210
OCD-UK, PO Box 8955, Nottingham NG10 9AU

OCD-UK is a non-profit making charity and not associated with any other organisation. Medical information is provided for education/information purposes only, you should obtain further advice from your doctor. Any links to external websites have been carefully selected, however we are not responsible for the content of these third party websites.