OCD

Information and news related to Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

Transcept OCD medication fails trial

Transcept Pharmaceuticals announced today that a mid-stage clinical trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of TO-2061, an experimental drug for the treatment of OCD, did not meet the main goal of showing improvements in treating symptoms any better than a placebo. The data from the trial showed that TO-2061 did not meet the primary efficacy endpoint to demonstrate an improvement in OCD symptoms versus a placebo.

The trial was testing the drug in patients with OCD who had not adequately responded to treatment with approved first-line therapies.

Article posted on: Sat, 22/12/2012 - 9:00am Read more...

Annual OCD conference 2012 (watch again) and 2013

Live streaming funded by Awards for All

Earlier in the month we hosted our annual conference in Cardiff which was very warmly received and welcomed by those that attended. For those that could not attend, we are delighted to say that you can now watch the entire conference online.

http://www.ocdconference.org/watch

All you will need is access the recordings is a computer with the ability to play Adobe Flash. Users of Apple (iPhone and iPad) devices may need to find access to other devices that can use Adobe Flash. The live streaming and conference recording was made possible through the support and funding of Awards for All, part of the Big Lottery Fund.

Article posted on: Fri, 23/11/2012 - 3:58pm Read more...

Relapse after successful treatment - NICE recommendation

For residents in England and Wales, where the NICE Guidelines are applicable, there is a small, but helpful recommendation which those that have had CBT previously but later relapsed may find helpful. All NHS Trusts are expected to adhere to the NICE Guidelines, so this quote from Page 22 (Discharge after recovery) of the NICE Quick reference guide for OCD could be incredibly helpful for some with OCD.

Article posted on: Wed, 03/10/2012 - 3:50pm Read more...

Self-Referring for CBT Treatment on the NHS (England residents)

Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT)

Whilst conducting our survey into people's experiences of OCD treatment through the NHS, we have discovered that many people are still not yet aware that in most parts of England you can now self-refer for Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) without the need to actually go through your GP. Although CBT access will still be added to your medical records, it does mean that some waiting time can be minimised by self-referring, and for some, the uncomfortable feeling of talking to your family GP can be avoided.

Article posted on: Wed, 03/10/2012 - 3:19pm Read more...

Had OCD treatment during 2011-2012? We might need your help!

Please help us by completing our research survey.

OCD-UK are conducting an independent review to capture people’s experiences of trying to access psychological therapy for the treatment of OCD through the NHS, and we are asking for your help with this review. This is just a reminder that if you have tried to access OCD treatment through the NHS during 2012, please do take the time to complete our survey over the next few days if you have not already done so.

Despite the introduction of the IAPT programme, OCD-UK remain concerned that in England the quality of treatment, and access to treatment for OCD is not improving at the rate it was promised. We also know from feedback from people in other parts of the UK that the treatment provision is even bleaker. This conclusion has come from listening to our members, be that through email, on our forums, or just by listening to those that call us on a daily basis. However, we are conscious that we need to research whether our conclusion is accurate or not and get some data to support or refute our conclusion.

We very much hope that through the project's duration, the evidence highlights improvements in treatment provision for OCD.   The results we capture through the project will be made available to the NHS and the Dept of Health to help guide them towards further improvements where necessary.

Please click the read more link to see if you are eligible to help us with this valuable research. Thank you.

Article posted on: Wed, 03/10/2012 - 2:07pm Read more...

A bit like that? Combatting the myth about OCD

Dr Stephanie Fitzgerald

This article was written by Dr Stephanie Fitzgerald and was first published during OCD Awareness Week, October 2011.

As a Clinical Psychologist working with people affected by Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), there are six words that for me epitomise the level of ignorance that exists around OCD: ‘Oh, I’m a bit like that’.  We’ve all heard someone say them. Whether it’s someone referring to the fact they like a tidy desk at work, or someone talking about how grim some festival toilets were, we’ve all heard someone discuss how they can be ‘a bit OCD about things like that’.

OCD, in this misunderstood form, seems to have become a very popular disorder. People view OCD as a quirky character trait meaning you like things done in a certain way, or in a certain order, or have your own routine which you are fond of and like to stick to. Alternatively, due to the media’s insistence as portraying OCD as an addiction to hand-washing and an intolerance of germs, OCD is viewed as an almost positive character trait. People believe by declaring themselves as ‘a bit OCD’ they are proudly declaring that they keep their home neat and tidy. Indeed nowadays it seems that people seem to aspire to have OCD and are very keen to tell others ‘Oh, I’m a bit like that’.

Article posted on: Tue, 24/07/2012 - 2:38pm Read more...

Are symptoms of OCD linked to movement disorders?

Are symptoms of OCD linked to movement disorders?

Researchers in the Netherlands have found that some people with certain rare illnesses such as Huntington’s disease and Sydenham’s chorea that affect their ability to control their movements, also show symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive-Disorder (OCD). Researchers think this may be because both movement disorders and OCD are caused by changes in the brain.

Article posted on: Mon, 21/05/2012 - 5:12pm Read more...

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